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Comments

Che Guevara

"allowing people to create personal media platforms and services of their own design."

Woteva - as long as I can keep downloading DVD quality movies for free I'm happy.

Charles

There are interesting ways that brands could get involved with seeding content on P2P.

James Cherkoff

Thanks Che - tell it like it is! ;-)

Hey Charles, yes the challenge, methinks, is to create content that works in a P2P world. And that you want to see popping up on Limewire et al...

Ian

Charles... indeed you are correct. Check out Groove Armada's deal with Bacardi/B-live. Kinda beats the hell out of "True Music", huh, James ;-)

Stratos

http://iancollingwood.posterous.com

James Cherkoff

Whaaassuuup...? ;-)

Brad Bell

James wrote:
"The problem, of course, is that this distribution method is not sanctioned by the people who make and own the content, most of which appears without any advertising. That's the advertising that pays the wages of the people who make the films and TV shows in the first place."

I am again reminded of iCraveTV.com from the mid 90s. This internet service took a page out of the cable companies' "How To Start A Rebroadcasting Industry" manual and began rebroadcasting TV over the internet - ads and all. In a bid to enforce complete control, the cable companies, TV networks, and Hollywood turned the lawyers loose on them and inadvertently set the stage for P2P media sharing. Idiocy and hypocrisy - particularly from the cable companies - breeds more of the same.

(They could have instead licensed the rebroadcasters in a similar manner to the cable companies and raised advertising rates - and saved the jobs of poor creative people who make the exciting film and TV products which make our lives bearable.)

My wife just shared her new favourite site with me: Read It, Swap It. P2P book sharing. It's just like The Pirate Bay, but it's analog. Instead of hosting torrent files, the site hosts lists of peoples' books. Instead of downloading digital media, these literary pirates use the Royal Mail to transfer books to each other. I'm not sure whether the site should be given a commendation for recycling or imprisoned for facilitating this criminal conspiracy. And what of the Royal Mail's complicity? Jail time for Lizzy?

James Cherkoff

Thanks Brad, that is a particularly wonderful example! I wonder if a site called Watch It, Swap It for DVD sharing would attract quite the furore that P2P has. Not until it becamr big enough to hurt Hollywood's bottom line, I suspect...

John Dodds

Read It Swap It and Watch It Swap It require effort and postal costs for their distribution. They're labour intensive in comparison to digital versions. That's a crucial difference. It also implies a degree of amateurism in contrast with the professional pirate. That's the difference the industry sees.

James Cherkoff

Mmmm, so the industry is only worried about systems that distribute at scale? The problem with that approach is that P2P was once small...

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